A NEW YEAR OPENS

Tomorrow, Sept. 2nd, we open our doors to a new year of wonderful shows and exciting events.  Come down to see our three new shows and welcome Maya - our director.

                                         MAYA FLETCHER

                                         MAYA FLETCHER

Get to know Maya.  The following is a short introduction.  Welcome to the gallery, Maya!

Painting and photography are my passions. I fell in love with art early in my life and this love truly developed during my college years. I overcame those telling me that there is no future in art and have been very happy to try to find my way in the art world.  My journey has taken me to Los Angeles, Miami, and all the way to Rome where I made my home for a time.  I have decided to continue my story and involvement in art back home in DC.  I am very excited to be taking on the job of running Studio Gallery.

I have had the privilege of working with beautiful artists at Project 4 in DC and Art Share in LA, where we created wonderful exhibitions and events.  In May, I graduated from the University of Maryland-College Park with a degree in Fine Arts.  Although I am still fresh to the art scene, I come with various experiences that have furthered my love, passion and desire to be involved in art.  I look forward to bringing this excitement to Studio Gallery and its wonderful artists.

Studio Gallery will reopen on Sept 2

Studio Gallery will be closed for two weeks.  We reopen on Sept 2nd with three exciting new shows.  Come on down for our First Friday on Sept 4th from 6pm to 8pm.

50th Anniversary Celebration

Join us Saturday July 25th from 4 - 7 for our 50th Anniversary Party.  All are welcome.

Our celebrations kicked off on Thursday July 23 with a fantastic talk by Nora Pouillon.  She shared anecdotes about her life's quest of bringing fresh, organic foods to the people of DC.  Her recent book, "My Organic Life", tells the story of how Nora became known throughout DC for her healthy, but always delicious, food.    

My Sculpture Starts With a Line

My Sculpture Starts With a Line -  by Jennie Lea Knight

A line can be a pencil mark on a piece of paper, but that same line can describe the tension that exists from the point of a shoulder to the supporting heel on the same side of a body.  The quality of the line can make it move very rapidly or ramble slowly, and the rate of speed will determine the degree of tension in the body the line is describing.

A line can describe volume.  A single line can create an enormous volume, and, by varying the thickness of the line,  the weight and tension within the volume can be shifted.  Emotion can also be created with a line.  There are nervous lines and humorous lines and heavy threatening lines and countless other kinds of lines that will enrich a drawing.

Drawing two lines creates still another tension, not a line describing a tension, but the tension that actually exists on a piece of paper  between the two lines that have been drawn, another dimension as it were.  If the two lines describe the legs of a figure standing, the opportunity exists for them to describe tension, weight, and volume, and to create still more tension by having those legs describe a twist that will affect the entire body. 

When I draw, these are the qualities I look for and try to capture in my work.  Sometimes, I start drawing because something I have seen says “sculpture” to me, and I need to make marks that will capture the sculpture in whatever I have seen.

I work in wood. I did in the past and I still do today.  There was a time, 20 years ago, when I made large abstract sculpture. I used  heavy industrial machines to mill the wood for my work.  The day came when I could no longer use those machines or work at that scale. I had developed a progressive condition for which there is no cure. There is fatigue and pain involved, and I realized that I had to give up a lot of things that had made up my life. I wondered what I would do with all the hours that those things had filled.  All my tools and the carefully dried wood were still there.  My eyes and hands were still part of me and functioning quite well, but I could no longer use chisels or sanders as the vibrations hurt my hands.  Piece by piece, I sold off the heaviest of the machinery. 

In a catalog, I found an ad for carving knives.  They were very beautiful, and I ordered two or three of them. The knives arrived and were indeed very beautiful, but what was I going to do with them?                                                                                                                                                                                                       I certainly could not make the kind of sculpture I had been making.  The long dry period continued. One day, I picked up a small piece of scrap wood from the studio and began to whittle on it just to see how good the knives were.  The knives were very good, and it felt wonderful to cut wood again.

I started with a line.  A chicken I had seen in the yard that day had a beautiful line from the crest of her neck down her back, becoming a flowing tail and then the great volume of her body, which was supported by two thin sticks that were her legs.  With this in my mind’s eye, I began to carve. Working on something that in reality is measured in inches while trying to keep the quality of  that dynamic line meant that I had to learn a new way of seeing and transposing what I saw.  It took a long time to finish that hen.  It was slow, tedious work.  I had to hold the piece with my left hand and carve with my right, and I had to learn a new set of techniques.  My mind wandered back to the last show I had before I became ill, and I asked myself what in the world I was doing.  Then I looked at my chicken again, and the answer was “I am carving wood.”  The world suddenly seemed a better place.  

1980's

Mapplethorpe Controversy - 1989

                                                                                                                                           Studio gallery participates in the mapplethorpe controversy


According to the ICA, "The Corcoran's decision sparked a controversial national debate: Should tax dollars support the arts? Who decides what is "obscene" or "offensive" in public exhibitions? And if art can be considered a form of free speech, is it a violation of the First Amendment to revoke federal funding on grounds of obscenity? To this day, these questions remain very much at issue."  Mapplethorpe became something of a cause célèbre for both sides of the American culture war. However, prices for many of the Mapplethorpe photographs doubled and even tripled as a consequence of all the attention. The artist's notoriety supposedly also helped the sale at Christie's auction house of Mapplethorpe's own collection of furniture, pottery, silver and works by other artists, which brought about $8 million.


from Wikipedia
 

Photo of Members from the mid-1980's

Studio Gallery's First Home

firststudiogallerycard.jpg

In 1955 Vera Knight, Jennie Lea Knight and Nancy Lloyd decided to create an art  gallery.  This was a response to all the artwork that Jennie Lea Knight and Nancy Lloyd were accumulating.  Jennie Lea Knight's parents bought this home at 814 Prince Street in Alexandria, Va in 1956.  They were Virginia's first professional art gallery and they showed both emerging artists, who found it hard to find a place to show, and prints from blue-chip artists like Miro and Picasso.  Thus, the first floor of this home became Studio Gallery.  

    Francisco Moncion: Painting Influenced by Ballet        by Francisca Rudolph On October 19th, in the late 1950's, Studio Gallery proudly opened Francisco Moncion’s first solo exhibition to the public.  Moncion was a self-taught Dominican dancer and painter who began to pursue his interest in the visual arts at around the same time that his ballet career took off.  His paintings, which were influenced by his experience as a dancer, depict his profound interest and love for the arts. Moncion’s particular artistic style expresses the dynamics of life in the ballet world as well as the fast paced characteristics of the city.  In 1961, Francisco Moncion returned to the Studio Gallery for his second solo exhibition.  This time around his paintings showed a more “haunting quality” with new additional themes of skeletal figures, decay, and disaster. On this fiftieth anniversary of the Studio Gallery, we want to honor artists like Francisco Moncion who created such personal and unique compositions of his passion for the arts.  

 

 

Francisco Moncion: Painting Influenced by Ballet        by Francisca Rudolph

On October 19th, in the late 1950's, Studio Gallery proudly opened Francisco Moncion’s first solo exhibition to the public.  Moncion was a self-taught Dominican dancer and painter who began to pursue his interest in the visual arts at around the same time that his ballet career took off.  His paintings, which were influenced by his experience as a dancer, depict his profound interest and love for the arts. Moncion’s particular artistic style expresses the dynamics of life in the ballet world as well as the fast paced characteristics of the city. 

In 1961, Francisco Moncion returned to the Studio Gallery for his second solo exhibition.  This time around his paintings showed a more “haunting quality” with new additional themes of skeletal figures, decay, and disaster. On this fiftieth anniversary of the Studio Gallery, we want to honor artists like Francisco Moncion who created such personal and unique compositions of his passion for the arts.

 

More Jennie Lea Knight

Jennie Lea Knight. American, 1933 - 2007

Eccentric abstract sculptor whose images came from nature.

Artist Statement

Sculpture will always be my most comfortable media…I think like a sculptor. I like the tangible quality of sculpture. It is something that you can touch. It is not elusive. The basic (tenets) of sculpture are simple, dealing with the same problems that we have to deal with in our own bodies, balance, strength, weight, posture, size and space. Sculpture is not an immediate process. It takes time...

Jennie Lea Knight

BIOGRAPHY - dated late 1950's

Jennie Lea Knight

Jennie Lea Knight was born March 31, 1933 in Washington, D.C.  Her professional training was received at the King-Smith School of Creative Arts, and she is a graduate of The Institute of Contemporary Arts where she studied painting, design, sculpture, and music.  Since the completion of her work at the Institute she has studied at American University with Robert Gates, James Caudle, and William Calfee.

In October of 1955, Miss Knight in conjunction with Miss Nancy Lloyd and Mrs. Vera Knight founded The Studio Gallery of Art, 814 Prince Street, Alexandria, and Northern Virginia’s first and only professional art gallery.  Since that time Miss Knight has served on the display staff of the gallery, on its exhibition jury, and as a teacher of painting and drawing at the gallery school.

Miss Knight has had one-man exhibitions of her paintings and drawings at the “O” Street Gallery, The Silver Spring Theatre Gallery, The Studio Gallery of Art, and The Martha Washington Library.  Her work has been in various competitive exhibitions including The Society of Washington Artists, and The Corcoran Annual Area Show, and in exhibitions at The Watkins Gallery and The Loudoun County Sketch Club.

Miss Knight’s painting is represented in The Phillips Gallery Collection and the private collections of Father Russell Woollen, Mr. and Mrs. Whitley P. McCoy, Mr. and Mrs. Austin Stevens, Mr. Walter Harlow, and Capt. and Mrs. E. K. Van Swearingen, and others.

Miss Knight is employed as an illustrator and photographer with The Laboratory of Psychology, The National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.

Review
AU News
09.24.2004
Watkins Gallery Presents Jennie Lea Knight; Esteemed Washington Sculptor to exhibit sculptures and drawings

WASHINGTON, DC (August 5, 2004) – The Watkins Gallery at American University presents Jennie Lea Knight from Sept. 27 to Oct. 23, 2004. Well known for her abstract wood sculptures that suggest natural forms, Jennie Lea Knight presents new miniature sculptures of animals. Knight has exhibited her art in the Washington area for more than 40 years, with solo exhibitions at the Phillips Collection, Jefferson Place Gallery, and Franz Bader Gallery among others. 

She founded the Studio Gallery in 1956 and has taught at the Corcoran School of Art, George Mason University, and American University. Her work is in the collections of The Phillips Collection, The Corcoran Gallery of Art, Smithsonian American Art Museum, and the National Museum of Women in the Arts. Knight lives and works on a small farm in Haymarket, VA.

This exhibition of new work by Jennie Lea Knight marks a major shift in scale for the artist. Known for her beautifully crafted wood abstractions, Knight spent years creating large sculpture through physically demanding techniques. However after developing a condition that affected her mobility, she began to make small hand carved pieces. The works in the exhibition were all carved by hand. They are small scale intimate pieces only a few inches in size. Her inspiration comes from the animals that live on her farm in Virginia – sheep, chickens, cats, and horses. The simplicity of the lines and shapes that Knight carves captures the majestic qualities of the animals in miniature but powerful sculptures.

jlk death notice
jlk10.jpg

50 Years: Then and Now opens July 22nd

Studio Sundays

Studio Gallery will present Studio Sundays this fall.  Once a month, we will open our doors, on a Sunday afternoon, to artists in other disciplines.  Poets, musicians, dancers, performance or video artists: we are open to wherever this program takes us.  Check in to see who our September artist will be.

We initiated this program in June.  Trumpeter Ethan Marks is a performance and sound artist from Austin, TX. He earned his Bachelor of Music degree from the University of Texas at Austin in 2013, and in the fall of 2015 he will begin graduate school at the California Institute of the Arts. He has performed as a soloist and in ensembles at such venues as the Blanton Museum of Art, Bass Concert Hall, the Kennedy Center, and Strathmore. 
For his Studio Sunday show, Ethan explored the relationship between sound and sight by realizing the gallery’s installations as free improvisations.