A Feminist DC Weekend Guide

Looking to switch things up from the typical historical sights of DC? Look no further! We have created a woman-focused guide of DC, highlighting all the best spots from museums to national parks to monuments!


The National Museum of Women in the Arts (NMWA)

1250 New York Ave NW, Washington, DC 20005

Open: Monday - Saturday 10am to 5pm, Sunday 12pm to 5pm

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Photo courtesy of Bill Badzo

The National Museum of Women in the Arts is a great spot to marvel at the work of women artists from both the past and the present. The NMWA is the first of its kind, a completely woman-focused museum dedicated to minimizing the gender imbalance in the art world by representing only female artists. The NMWA features enough art for everyone looking to learn more about impactful woman artists, with 4,500 artworks by more than 1,000 women! They also hold temporary exhibitions, with some exciting new installations to look out for in the coming months such as “Women Artists of the Dutch Golden Age” and “Paper Routes - Women to Watch 2020.”


Vietnam Women’s Memorial

5 Henry Bacon Dr SW, Washington, DC 20007

Open: 24 Hours

Photo courtesy of Nancy Maness

Take a stroll in the beautiful landscaped grounds of the Constitution Gardens, and you’ll find the Vietnam Women’s Memorial. A black granite monument dedicated to remembering the women who served in Vietnam, this memorial is a must-see. It is one of the very few statues that depict women and their impact in history.



Daughters of the American Revolution Museum

1776 D St NW, Washington, DC 20006

Open: Monday - Saturday 8:30 am to 4 pm

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Photo courtesy of  www.dar.org , from the DAR Museum exhibit, “An Agreeable Tyrant: Fashion After the American Revolution.”

Photo courtesy of www.dar.org, from the DAR Museum exhibit, “An Agreeable Tyrant: Fashion After the American Revolution.”

The Daughters of the American Revolution Museum is a decorative arts museum collecting objects from pre-industrial America. The DAR museum also features 31 period rooms, which showcase the interior design and furnishings of rooms from the late 1600’s to the early 1900’s. The current exhibition, which is woman-focused, is about how needlework between 1820 and 1920 allowed for women to express their thoughts, feelings, and opinions on the world through a creative outlet. Stop by the Daughters of the American Revolution Museum before December 31, 2019 to catch the exhibition, “A Piece of Her Mind: Culture and Technology in American Quilts”!


Clara Barton National Historic Site

5801 Oxford Rd, Glen Echo, MD 20812

Open for limited tours: Fridays and Saturdays at 1:00 PM, 2:00 PM, 3:00 PM, and 4:00 PM.

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Photo courtesy of  The Library of Congress

Photo courtesy of The Library of Congress

Another feminist location to check out is the Clara Barton National Historic Site. A little way away from the hustle and bustle of D.C., in Glen Echo, Maryland, it is the only site operated by the National Park Service on this list. Clara Barton was the founder of the American Red Cross, as well as a nurse during the Civil War. Her civil rights advocacy and passion for humanitarian work make her historic site a can’t-miss during your feminist tour!


The National Portrait Gallery

8th St NW & F St NW, Washington, DC 20001

Open Every Day: 11:30 am to 7 pm

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Photo courtesy of Difference Engine

The National Portrait Gallery has an expansive collection of portraits in a variety of mediums that feature men and women of “remarkable character and achievement.” Some of the portraits of women on display at the National Portrait Gallery are Susan B. Anthony, Michelle Obama, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Aretha Franklin, Meryl Streep, and Elaine de Kooning. Admission at the National Portrait Gallery is free, and open every day except for December 25th. Head on over to The National Portrait Gallery to check out the exhibitions, events, and portraits featuring influential women!


 
Caroline
 

From staff contributor Caroline McKenna

Approaches & Perspective: Abstract Art (Part I)

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